David Attenborough FTW!!!

studyofnature:

Wow! Fungi plant growth - The Private Life of Plants - David Attenborough - BBC wildlife (via BBCWorldwide)

This is a really cool video of fungi growing (time lapse). It’s pretty neat and a little gross! It’s not a very long video, so I encourage everyone to watch it :)

thatwhichwasntsaid:

“Its tongue weighs as much as an elephant, its heart is the size of a car, and some of its blood vessels are so wide you could swim down them. Its tail alone is the width of a small aircrafts wings.”
Amazing.

thatwhichwasntsaid:

“Its tongue weighs as much as an elephant, its heart is the size of a car, and some of its blood vessels are so wide you could swim down them. Its tail alone is the width of a small aircrafts wings.”

Amazing.

BBC Life

brmurray:

BBC Life is a documentary series with a title that sums up it’s content, and content that pretty much sums up the scope of it’s title. I got my hands on a copy of the series a while back and have been enthralled ever since.  

Some wildlife documentaries can probably be classified as being more boring than watching grass grow, but it pleases me to say that this series has even found a way to make watching grass grow into one of the most fascinating things you’ve ever seen. A single, 60 second shot in the plant life episode shows an entire copse of flowers and other vegetation sprouting, growing, blooming and dying, all at once. This shot alone took over a year to design and create and involves some of the most ingenious camera, rigging and editing work I’ve ever seen. (but no CG!!!)

The series splits it episodes up into categories of life, allowing you to skip to your favorites and skip over whatever might not interest you. In my case, that would be birds and insects, respectively. That said, after watching the rest of the series, I’ve finally decided to watch the insects episode and in true BBC Life fashion I haven’t been dissapointed.

There’s a type of beetle in Chile that climbs a 40 metre tree to mate. The females climb first and do what they do to attract males, and as the males climb the tree, they fight each other to see who will be dominant. Unlike the females, the males have enormous jaws that actually reach up and over the bodies of their rivals, allowing them to grab on to them from the sides and - SUPLEX - them off of the higher branches of the tree. They pummel each other for the dominant position, then latch on, stand straight up with their rival locked in, and fall over backwards, hurling their unlucky foe to the ground below. (Nobody gets hurt though, like all beetles, these gents have some excellent armor.)

Then, get this. The alpha beetle gets to the top, chases the female around all day, and tops off a romantic evening by, that’s right, suplexing her out of the tree. (She’s got armor too, so, no harm no foul I suppose?) I can tell you right now I never saw myself laughing my ass off at a wildlife documentary about disgusting insects, but there you go.

Every episode of BBC Life is packed with this kind of stuff, which is why I have to strongly recommend it to anyone who might even be remotely interested. Some of it is hilarious, some of it heartbreaking, but most importantly, for a wildlife documentary, all of it is fascinating and none of it is boring.

P.S. Fruit Bats party hard.
P.P.S. David Attenborough = LEGENDARY 

vetica:

BBC Life - Plants (On Location) in HD

David Attenborough explaining the challenges they had to face filming plants. 

stopvoleuse:

Life on Earth 1x01 “The Infinite Variety”

Life on Earth: A Natural History by David Attenborough is a groundbreaking television natural history series made by the BBC in association with Warner Bros. and Reiner Moritz Productions. It was transmitted in the UK from 16 January 1979.
During the course of the series Attenborough, following the format established by Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation and Jacob Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man, travels the globe in order to trace the story of the evolution of life on the planet. Like the earlier series, it was divided into 13 programmes (each of around 55 minutes’ duration) so that it would exactly fill a scheduler’s quarter-year. The executive producer was Christopher Parsons and the music was composed by Edward Williams.
(Wikipedia)

stopvoleuse:

Life on Earth 1x01 “The Infinite Variety”

Life on Earth: A Natural History by David Attenborough is a groundbreaking television natural history series made by the BBC in association with Warner Bros. and Reiner Moritz Productions. It was transmitted in the UK from 16 January 1979.

During the course of the series Attenborough, following the format established by Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation and Jacob Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man, travels the globe in order to trace the story of the evolution of life on the planet. Like the earlier series, it was divided into 13 programmes (each of around 55 minutes’ duration) so that it would exactly fill a scheduler’s quarter-year. The executive producer was Christopher Parsons and the music was composed by Edward Williams.

(Wikipedia)

wearepainters:

A sound design project I created for my University, using footage from David Attenborough’s BBC documentary Life, after editing the colours of the film, I composed & produced the music.

vonswank:

I watched this last night. It’s part of the BBC series, “Life”. Check it out if you haven’t, it’s some of the most amazing stuff I have ever seen in my life, alongside “Planet Earth”. It makes me hate people and want them all to die. Weird?

David Attenborough is my jam. 

Great time lapse footage of starfish and other sea creatures.  You may have to click through to watch it on youtube.

79 plays

stopvoleuse:

“First Fossils”, composed by Edward Williams, from the soundtrack to Life on Earth (1979)

…And so in late 2009, 30 years on from the day it was created, we can all enjoy some of the most beautiful music made for some of the greatest TV ever produced.
Jonny Trunk, Trunk Records

The soundtrack to David Attenborough’s Life on Earth wasn’t released until 30 years after the programme first aired, when serendipity brought a copy pressed by the composer as a gift for one of the musicians into the hands of Jonny Trunk. Trunk obtained permission from the BBC to issue the album and from Sir David Attenborough, who described the music as “jolly good”, to use the famous Life on Earth frog photograph as cover artwork.

“First Fossils” is a track from the series’ first episode, “The Infinite Variety”. It’s a mysterious and beautiful piece of music, filled to brimming with a wonder of nature.

(via ellagracew)

Here is an amazing link to a full hour long video.  It also includes many other David Attenborough videos to watch. 

(via planfortheworst)